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CLES Orange Shirt Day

Students and staff recognized this very important day by learning the truth about residential schools and the impact of these schools on the lost children, survivors, their families and communities.  Staff and students recognized this day by wearing orange, while teachers planned activities to acknowledge the past and honour indigenous culture.

 

PLEASE SEE THE GALLERY OF PICTURES AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS POST!!!

 

Kindergarten, Grade One & Two students listened to the story "Hoop Dancers Teachings by Teddy Anderson. They discussed equality, wisdom from elders, goodness, kindness and caring. The students watched videos of Teddy Anderson and Dallas Arcand hoop dancing! (Dallas is a world champion hoop dancer, and he once visited us at CLES!) Kindergarten students had the opportunity to try hoop dancing in gym class. It was great exercise!

Grade Ones read "The Moccassins" - a story about an Indigenous foster child who is given a special gift by his foster mother - moccassins.  This gift helps him feel love and acceptance. Grade Ones tried on real moccassins. Mrs. Janvier-Crookedneck taught the students Indigenous hand games!

Grade Three students read the book, "Go Show the World - A Celebration of Indigenous Heros" by Wab Kinew, which is a rap song, and includes figures such as our Canadian NHL goalie Carey Price, NASA astronaut John Herrinton, and Crazy Horse.

Grade Three students also read the book, "When We Were Alone" by David A. Robertson & Julie Flett, a story about an elder who describes how her hair was cut off at her school, and how she wasn't allowed to speak her language at the school. In the summers, away from the school, she would braid weeds into her hair to make it long again, and speak her language proudly. At the school she was separated from her brother, and not allowed to see him or play with him.  In the winters, they would find eachother, take off their mitts and hold hands. Grade Threes enjoyed bannock, beading, and learned how to braid, and how to play Inuit high kick games.  They also studied Harvey Scanie's artwork. 

Grade Fours read "I AM Not A Number", "When I Was Eight" and "Phyllis' Orange Shirt" - learning about residential students losing their identities. Students learned about Mr. Alex Janvier, a residential school survivor and world renowned artist; students learned about his paintings and were inspired to create their own.

Today was such an IMPORTANT day for learning and remembrance.  EVERY CHILD MATTERS.

 

 

 

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